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Nock, Oswald Stevens (1905—1994)
Professional signal engineer and prolific writer on locomotives and railways generally. Author of over 100 railway books. See also “Practice and Performance”Explain '‘Practice & Performance’'
Non-Passenger Coaching Stock (NPCS)
Vehicles such as Horse boxes, Carriage Trucks, Passenger Brake Vans, Parcels Vans, Fish Vans and the like which are so constructed as to be suitable for use in passenger trains. Essentially this required the vehicle to meet certain standards of running gearExplain 'Running Gear' and to be fitted with continuous brakesExplain 'Continuous Breaks'. In the working timetablesExplain 'Working Time Table (WTT)', the LNWR referred to NPCS as “passenger vehicles”.
Non-corridor Coach
A carriage which does not have a corridor. That is to say each compartment is separate and not connected to the others. There is also no corridor-connection or gangway to allow one to pass from carriage to carriage along the train.
North British Locomotive Company
A firm of locomotive builders formed in 1903 from the amalgamation of Neilson Reid & Co., Dubs & Co., and Sharp Stewart & Co., all of whom had been separate and independent locomotive builders in the Glasgow area. NBL became easily the largest builder in the UK, but ceased building railway locomotives in 1958.
North British Railway
A Scottish company whose main line ran from Berwick on Tweed via Edinburgh and the Forth Bridge to Kinnaber Junction (for Aberdeen) with branches from Edinburgh to Glasgow and Mallaig (for Skye), and to Carlisle. Not part of the LNWR — a partner of the Great Northern and North Eastern Railways in the East Coast route, grouped into the LNER in 1923.
North Eastern Division
One of the three divisions set up when the LNWR was formed on 16th July 1846, the others being the Northern DivisionExplain 'Northern Division' and the Southern DivisionExplain 'Southern Division'. All three had their own operating methods and workshops for locomotive etc. The North Eastern Division was merged with the Northern Division in 1857, whereupon its locomotive works at LongsightExplain 'Longsight, Manchester' was closed and all such work concentrated at CreweExplain 'Crewe Works'.
North Eastern Railway (NER)
Formed in 1854. In 1923 the company was grouped into the LNER. Not part of LNWR but an associate in the important cross-country express services between Liverpool and Manchester, on the LNWR, and Newcastle and Hull on the NER.
North London Railway (NLR)
Incorporated in 1846 as the East and West India Docks &Birmingham Junction Railway, the lines between Bow and Chalk Farm were opened in sections between 1850 and 1852. The name was changed to the North London Railway from 8th July 1853. Worked by London North Western Railway from Dec 1908, it was eventually absorbed into London, Midland & Scottish RailwayExplain 'London Midland & Scottish (LMS)'. Its original route was from the London North Western RailwayExplain 'London & North Western Railway (LNWR)' at Camden to the West India Docks, Blackwall. Subsequent extensions and connecting lines enabled it to cover much of the northern and eastern suburbs of London. It also had junctions with the LNWR, Midland, Great Northern, Great Eastern, London Tilbury and Southend, and Great Western.
North Midland Railway (NMR)
Opened between Derby and Rotherham on 11th May 1840 and extended to Leeds on 1st July, the NMR eventually became part of the Midland RailwayExplain 'Midland Railway (MR)'.
North Staffordshire Railway (NSR)
Not part of the LNWR but a close associate. NSR lines were centred on Stoke-on-Trent and connected with the LNWR at Crewe, Sandbach, Macclesfield, Stafford and Colwich (on the Trent Valley LineExplain 'Trent Valley Railway'). The NSR shared goods services between Edge HillExplain 'Edge Hill, Liverpool' and the Midlands with the LNWR and several Manchester–London and Birmingham passenger and goods expresses ran over the NSR via Macclesfield and Stoke. Colloquially known as the “Knotty”, from the company symbol of a Staffordshire knot; grouped into the LMS in 1923.
North Union Railway
Formed in 1834 by the amalgamation of the Wigan Branch RailwayExplain 'Wigan Branch Railway' (opened 1832) and the not-yet-built Preston & Wigan Railway. Opened throughout in 1838. Taken over jointly in 1846 by the Grand JunctionExplain 'Grand Junction Railway (GJR)' and Manchester & LeedsExplain 'Manchester & Leeds Railway (MLR)' railways, history thereafter complicated. Ran from Parkside on the Liverpool & Manchester RailwayExplain 'Liverpool & Manchester Railway (LMR)' to Preston; most of it now forms part of the West Coast Main LineExplain 'West Coast Main Line'.
Northern Counties Committee
Formed in 1903 by the Midland Railway’sExplain 'Midland Railway (MR)' Irish interests amalgamating with the Belfast and Northern Counties Railway. At the GroupingExplain 'Grouping' in 1923 it became part of the LMS.
Northern Division
One of the three divisions set up when the LNWR was formed on 16th July 1846, the others being the North Eastern DivisionExplain 'North Eastern Division' and the Southern DivisionExplain 'Southern Division'. All three had their own operating methods and workshops for locomotive etc. The Northern Division took over responsibility for the North Eastern Division in 1857, whereupon the locomotive works at LongsightExplain 'Longsight, Manchester' was closed and all such work concentrated at the Northern Division’s works at CreweExplain 'Crewe Works'. The Northern and Southern Division locomotive departments were merged in 1862 but much of the administration remained separate until formation of the LMS in 1923.
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